Facts October 25

Facts Still Matter: College Strike

Patrick Brown continued his campaign of misinformation at Queen’s Park. Whether it’s a speech, a phone call, an interview or a scrum, Patrick Brown needs to remember that Facts Still Matter in Ontario.

He Claimed: “Well I want the Premier telling both sides [colleges and faculty] to get back to the table immediately”

Fact: This week, Premier Wynne did just that.

“I have committed to them and to all — we’ll do everything to encourage both sides to get back to the table…and we want everyone to get back to the table to come to an agreement there.”

(Source: Legislative Assembly of Ontario, Hansard, October 24, 2017)

He Claimed: “The government continues to sign these [energy] contracts”

Fact: The Province suspended Large Renewable Procurement last fall.

(Source: https://news.ontario.ca/mei/en/2016/09/ontario-suspends-large-renewable-energy-procurement.html)

He Claimed: “This was just, you know, the government said they needed to hear from people and that’s why they needed to drag it out, but it was for political theatre”
Fact: We moved the legislation through the House as quickly as possible, while also balancing the democratic process and hearing from Ontarians on the specific details of the final bill.

Fact: It was also important to ensure the government’s decision making was on the public record, as this proved useful when a similar law faced a constitutional challenge in British Columbia.

Please share the Ontario Liberal Party website factsstillmatter.ca if you agree that Facts Still Matter in Ontario!


New MPP role

From Energy to Infrastructure

Your MPP has a new role in the government, as of October 19, 2017.

With the completion of the Fair Hydro Act, I’ve moved from the Ministry of Energy to the Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure. It makes sense. I have known about the impending move for some time. There are some pressing issues with which to deal in Infrastructure within Ontario.

The move re-unites me with an old friend, Bob Chiarelli, with whom I worked in Energy for three successful years. I’ve quipped to my colleagues that I may be the only MPP who has served in our Ministry of Energy who is sorry to leave!

I loved the Energy file, thoroughly enjoyed working with the issues and the energy community (some of which relates to our infrastructure in Ontario and will continue anyway), and brought my education and work background in the sector to my Energy role.

I will be succeeded in Energy by Ottawa area MPP Nathalie Desrosiers. Energy Minister Glenn Thibeault did an outstanding job during his 2017 visit to Estimates Committee. Kudos to him for bringing along key experts in the sector, and showcasing their insight to deal with technical queries. Glenn has done a great job with the Fair Hydro Act, which has lowered electricity bills, and made the basis on which electricity charges are calculated more fair and equitable.


That time again

Campaign Team 2018

Not everybody who gets cranked up for an election campaign wants to sit on the Riding Association Executive on an ongoing basis. One of the attractions of an election campaign is that it has a start and a finish.

Others enjoy the ongoing evolutionary progress of the Riding Association. Some like both, for a while.

There is going to be an Ontario Provincial Election on Thursday June 7, 2018. At the bottom of this page, in the footer, you’ll see a calendar countdown to the decisive event.

Our Riding Association has a strong record of good results to bring to our doors in Lisgar, Meadowvale and Streetsville. We are starting to look for keen people to fill key roles. Send our Campaign Manager an e-mail. The Riding Association has a permanent phone number. It is easy to remember: (905) LIBERAL. That number is (905) 542-3725 on your numeric keypad.

Let’s get back into the habit of thinking about one another, and seeing our faces again. If this will be your first time, please start with a phone call, or an e-mail.


GO Streetsville Parking

Real commuting progress

GO train service

Better GO Transit service means more people can leave their cars at home, avoid the stress of traffic, and get to work, to school or to wherever they need to go more frequently and conveniently.

Here is the difference between talking about public transit, as the other parties do, and doing something about it, as Liberals do. When our Liberal government in Ontario was elected 14 years ago, on October 2, 2003, Milton Line commuters had just five trains going eastbound toward Toronto in the morning, and five westbound through Mississauga to Milton in the afternoon. Each train pulled ten cars.

Today, there are ten trains in each direction, each pulling 12 passenger cars. That is more than double the daily train GO train service. There is more:

  • A new bus repair depot, where GO buses can start and finish their Mississauga run, located in Streetsville, and employing nearly 200 people;
  • GO buses connect frequently to Toronto and other points regularly through the day, with ample capacity for the passenger demand. You can use your Presto Card on the GO buses;
  • A new GO train station in Lisgar, opened in 2007 ahead of schedule, and the first in Mississauga in more than a quarter century;
  • All our western Mississauga GO stations have been upgraded, the platforms lengthened, with free Wi-Fi in the station;
  • The Presto Card has replaced having cash fare for the MiWay connector bus, a multi-ride ticket or monthly pass for the train, and tokens for the TTC. And now your Presto Card will get you on the TTC subway for just $1.50, mirroring the same-journey discount on Mi-Way;
  • There is a modern, mid-platform tunnel connecting to the platform at the Streetsville GO station;
  • Parking has expanded at Meadowvale, and three times at Streetsville. The newest Streetsville GO parking expansion has 120 brand new spots now open on Princess Street, just off Thomas Street.

That’s doing something about public transit in western Mississauga.


Thanksgiving 2017

The blessings of being an Ontarian

Happy Thanksgiving!

Our western Mississauga neighbourhoods of Lisgar, Meadowvale and Streetsville have enjoyed some of the best of the western world’s strongest economy in Ontario. We have a lot for which to be thankful.

A Happy Thanksgiving weekend to all our Mississauga-Streetsville Provincial Liberal Association members, friends and supporters.

In this 150th year of celebrating Ontario as a founding province of Canada (the other three of four were Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia), we have a great deal to be thankful for.

Warm wishes to one and all in Lisgar, Meadowvale and Streetsville.


Canada Day 2017

Canada Day 2017

On Saturday July 1 2017, Canada turned 150 years young.

Ontario is one of the ‘original four’ provinces of Canada, along with Quebec, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick. Prince Edward Island was very close to joining Canada in 1867, but wanted more time to talk about it. Prince Edward Islanders valued dialogue and discussion as much then as Canadians do now. PEI finally joined Canada in 1873. Manitoba had joined Canada in 1870.

British Columbia joined Canada in 1871, with the promise of a railway (now the Canadian Pacific Railway) to link the east with the Pacific coast. With the Canadian Pacific Railway in service, and settlers populating the prairies (then called “Rupert’s Land”). Saskatchewan and Alberta completed the Atlantic to Pacific provincial lineup in 1905.

Happy Canada Day, Lisgar, Meadowvale and Streetsville!


Ontario Economy

Balanced budget for a strong Ontario


In mid-April, the Ontario PC Party proposed an Opposition Day motion (which was decisively defeated) on the debt that Ontario incurred while rebuilding the Province’s essential infrastructure in the years since the recession began. I spoke about the Ontario economy, and the moves that the Province has made to grow its GDP, and reduce the proportion of our GDP that is net debt.

The Ontario Budget for 2017-18 proposed full pharmacare for all OHIP-eligible Ontarians age 24 and under. See the Party Comparison web page to view how the three parties stack up on pharmacare.

Ontario is well on its way to being the Great Lakes Basin’s first trillion-dollar economy. Ontario’s current net debt to GDP ratio is lower than it was on the last day of the last government’s watch, and has been falling for years. Ontario’s budget is back in balance, right on schedule. Here is what I said about the Ontario economy.


Energy Policies

NDP ludicrous; Conservatives MIA

As we look at the critical area of energy policy, the contrast between Ontario’s evolution to sustainable, non-polluting energy policy, and the mess proposed by the NDP, and the utter vacuum of the Ontario PC Party could not be more stark. Let’s look at the opposition ideas on energy:

NDP: mind-numbing, ineffective waste

The centrepiece of the NDP’s energy policy is to utterly waste more than $8 billion in taxpayer’s money in a re-nationalization of the partly-privatized Hydro One. Such a move would be a wholesale diversion from such infrastructure projects as the re-development of Trillium Health Partners hospitals at the Credit Valley and Queensway sites; cancellation of the Highway 401 widening; and a standstill on public transit projects that keep Mississauga from being trapped in gridlock.

For a complete analysis of the NDP energy policy mess, click here.

Four-point PC Party energy boondoggle

Don’t look for an Ontario PC Party energy policy, plan or program anywhere. It doesn’t exist. Instead, look at what the PC Party has done in the past, and says it will do in the future in the Legislature. Here is the de-facto four-point Ontario PC Party energy program:

  1. Do Nothing. Run all energy-generation and transmission assets into the ground. Don’t invest. Don’t spend. It is what they did in government in the 1990s, and in the years prior to that;
  2. Burn coal. During the Harris-Eves years, the principal electricity generation added by the Conservatives came from burning dirty coal. By the end of the last term of the last PC government, some 25 percent of Ontario’s electricity came from burning coal. Each year, the Greater Toronto Area endured more than 50 smog-alert, dirty-air days;
  3. Buy expensive electricity on the U.S. spot market. When Ontario ran short of power during the Harris-Eves years, which it regularly did, the last Conservative government bought expensive electricity (more than $1.00 per kWh on the U.S. spot market), which it re-sold at a whopping loss at 4.3 cents per kWh);
  4. Blame the Liberals. When all else fails, and under the Conservatives with electricity, all else always fails, they turn to ideology and incendiary rhetoric, and just blame the Liberals.

Get the facts about energy in Ontario

 


Windsor

Meeting with Liberals in Windsor

It was a delightful reunion with my good friend, and former Windsor West MPP Teresa Piruzza, and members of the Riding Executives from Windsor-Tecumseh and Essex, in Ontario’s southwest. Business sometimes brings me to the Windsor area. It was good to spend an evening in conversation with key people in three ridings that were recently solidly Liberal.

I enjoyed hearing their perspectives and suggestions on what the Party might be doing differently, or better. We talked about what activities the three Riding Associations could do to enhance their chances in 2018.


The Agenda

Electricity in Ontario on TVO

Bob on TVO

Ontario Parliamentary Assistant to Energy Bob Delaney dismantles PC and NDP energy critics and explains the Province’s price reductions on electricity on TV Ontario in March 2017.

Mississauga-Streetsville MPP Bob Delaney knows TV Ontario’s host of The Agenda, Steve Paikin, best as a backchecking hockey player who protects his goalie (which is Bob). On March 2, 2017, Bob appeared on The Agenda to talk about electricity in Ontario with the energy critics of the PC and NDP parties. It wasn’t even close. Watch Bob handle both critics and discuss Ontario’s price reduction on electricity.

Ontario has bought tomorrow’s electricity system, paid for it with yesterday’s money, and financed it at rates close to zero. The rest of the world is scrambling to catch up, seeing its own electricity prices rise faster than ours in Ontario, and needs to buy today’s electricity system, pay for it with tomorrow’s money, and finance it at interest rates that are on their way up.